AATSEEL
 
 

AATSEEL Annual Awards

The AATSEEL Publications Committee is responsible for overseeing the appointment of editors for the AATSEEL Newsletter and Slavic and East European Journal, and also for the award of prizes for publications in the various disciplines participating in AATSEEL. For information on our activities, please follow the appropriate link below:

Nominees for the 2014 AATSEEL book prizes (Nomination will be closed as of 1 May)

Nominees for the 2014 AATSEEL Book Prizes

Best Contribution to Language Pedagogy (books or other material published in 2011, 2012 and 2013 eligible):

  • Dostoevsky, Fyodor. Кроткая: Фантастический рассказ. The Meek One: A Fantastic Story. An Annotated Russian Reader. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2011. Edited by Julia Titus
  • Gerhart, Genevra with Eloise M. Boyle.The Russian's World 4th Edition. Bloomington, IN: Slavica Publishers, 2012.
  • Каган, О.Е. и А.С. Кудыма.Учимся писать по-русски: экспресс-курс для двуязычных взрослых. Санкт-Петербург: «Златоуст», 2012.
  • Mëniku, Linda and Héctor Campos. Discovering Albanian 1: Textbook, Workbook, Audio Supplement. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2011.
  • Shevchuk, Yuri. Beginner's Ukrainian with Interactive Online Workbook. New York, NY: Hippocrene Books, 2011.
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Best Contribution to Slavic Linguistics (books published in 2012 and 2013 eligible):

  • Bailyn, John Frederick. The Syntax of Russian. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012.
  • Tomić, Olga Mišeska. A Grammar of Macedonian. Bloomington, IN: Slavica Publishers, 2012.
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Best Book in Literary/Cultural Studies (books published in 2012 and 2013 eligible):

  • Apollonio, Carol and Angela Brintlinger eds. Chekhov for the 21st Century. Bloomington, IN: Slavica Publishers, 2012.
  • Bolton, Jonathan. Worlds of Dissent: Chapter 77, The Plastic People of the Universe, and Czech Culture under Communism. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012.
  • Edmond, Jacob. A Common Strangeness: Contemporary Poetry, Cross-Cultural Encounter, Comparative Literature. New York, NY: Fordham University Press, 2012.
  • Gillespie, Alyssa Dinega. Taboo Pushkin: Topics, Texts, Interpretations. Madison, WI: Wisconsin University Press, 2012.
  • Glaser, Amelia M. Jews and Ukrainians in Russia's Literary Borderlands: From the Shtetl Fair to the Petersburg Bookshop. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2012.
  • Holmgren, Beth. Starring Madame Modjeska: On Tour in Poland and America. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2012.
  • Kleespies, Ingrid. A Nation Astray: Nomadism and National Identity in Russian Literature. DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 2012.
  • Mucz, Michael. Baba's Kitchen Medicines: Folk Remedies of Ukrainian Settlers in Western Canada. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: The University of Alberta Press, 2012.
  • Peschio, Joe. Poetics of Impudence and Intimacy in the Age of Pushkin Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2012.
  • Romanska, Magda. The Post-Traumatic Theatre of Grotowski and Kantor: History and Holocaust in Akropolis and Dead Class. London, UK: Anthem Press, 2012.
  • Soroka, Mykola. Faces of Displacement: The Writings of Volodymyr Vynnychenko. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2012.
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Best Translation into English (books published in 2012 and 2013 eligible):

  • Chulkov, Mikhail, Matvei Komarov, and Nikolai Karamzin. Three Russian Tales of the Eighteenth Century: The Comely Cook, Vanka Kain, and "Poor Liza". DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 2012. Translated from the Russian by David Gasperetti.
  • Dichter, Wilhelm. God's Horse and the Atheists' School. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2012. Translated from the Polish by Madeline G. Levine.
  • Herzen, Alexander. A Herzen Reader. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2012. Translated from the Russian by Kathleen Parthé.
  • Gogol, Nikolai. Dead Souls. New York, NY: New York Review Books, 2012. Translated from the Russian by Donald Rayfield.
  • Jergoviс́, Miljenko. Mama Leone . Brooklyn, NY: Archipelago Books, 2012. Translated from the Croatian by David Williams.
  • Krzhizhanovsky, Sigizmund. The Letter Killers Club. New York, NY: New York Review Books, 2012. Translated from the Russian by Joanne Turnbull with Nikolai Formozov. Introduction by Caryl Emerson.
  • Pilch, Jerzy. My First Suicide. Rochester, NY: Open Letter, University of Rochester Press, 2012. Translated from the Polish by David Frick.
  • Platonov, Andrey. Happy Moscow. New York, NY: New York Review Books, 2012. Translated from the Russian by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler and others.
  • Propp, Vladimir Yakovlevich. The Russian Folktale. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 2012. Edited and translated from the Russian by Sibelan Forrester.
  • Smilevski, Goce. Freud's Sister. New York, NY: Penguin Books, 2012. Translated from the Macedonian by Christina E. Kramer.
  • Stănescu, Nichita. Wheel with a Single Spoke and other poems. Brooklyn, NY: Archipelago Books, 2012. Translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter.
  • Starova, Luan. My Father's Books. Madison, WI : University of Wisconsin Press, 2012. Translated from the Macedonian by Christina E. Kramer.
  • Starova, Luan. The Time of the Goats. Madison, WI : University of Wisconsin Press, 2012. Translated from the Macedonian by Christina E. Kramer.
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Eligibility requirements and selection procedures for the AATSEEL book prizes:

AATSEEL  awards prizes to outstanding publications in the fields of 1) language pedagogy, 2) linguistics, 3) literary and/or cultural scholarship, and 4) translations into English. For more on the specific eligibility requirements of the individual prizes, and for recent recipients of the prizes, see below. General eligibility requirements and nomination procedures pertinent to all the prizes include:
  1. In order to be eligible for consideration for an AATSEEL Book Award, the author (not the nominator) must be a member of AATSEEL. In the case of books written by more than one author, at least one one of the authors must be a member of AATSEEL. Books by individuals who are not members of AATSEEL (or books written by teams of authors none of whom is a member of AATSEEL) cannot be considered for an AATSEEL book award.
  2. Nominated works must be devoted to the languages and the literary/cultural traditions of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.
  3. For the prizes in linguistics, literary/cultural scholarship and translation, works nominated must have been published within the two preceding calendar years. For the prize in language pedagogy, works nominated must have been published within the three preceding calendar years.
  4. The nomination process will normally end on 1 May. Prizes will be announced at the annual meeting of AATSEEL in early January.
  5. Both members of AATSEEL and non-members may make nominations for the prizes.
  6. In order to make a nomination for one of the prizes, one need only send an e-mail message to the chair of the publications committee (see "contact information" below). The chair will then contact the press. Presses wishing to nominate books should send a single copy of the work to the chair, who will (shortly after May 1) supply a list of the relevant jurors and their addresses. Presses are then asked to send a copy of the book directly to each of the jurors.

Specific eligibility guidelines for each prize:

Best Contribution to Language Pedagogy:

The prize in pedagogy may recognize either language-pedagogical materials or contributions to literature on the theory and practice of language teaching. The former category should be understood broadly to include textbooks, computer software, testing materials, and other instructional tools. Nominated works in the latter category should be single or multi-author books. At the committee's discretion, the prize may in some years be granted not to a single publication, but to the aggregate works of one individual whose publications as a whole have made an outstanding contribution to the field of language pedagogy.

Best Contribution to the Study of Slavic Linguistics:

Nominated works should be scholarly monographs (including grammars and dictionaries) that treat topics in any field of linguistic inquiry. Typically, translated and edited volumes would not be considered.

Best Book in Literary/Cultural Scholarship:

Nominated works should be scholarly books which treat topics in any field of literary or cultural studies. Normally, this will exclude works of historical scholarship, unless these are devoted to the history of literary or cultural institutions or to interdisciplinary topics uniting history and cultural life.

Best Translation into English:

Nominees for this prize should be book-length translations of a literary work, an epiliterary genre (letters, memoirs, essays, etc.), or a scholarly work. At the discretion of the jury, two prizes may be awarded, one for a literary or epiliterary work, the other for a translation of a strictly scholarly character.

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An explanation of recent modifications in eligibility and selection procedures for the book prizes

The Publications Committee of AATSEEL, with the approval of the Executive Council, has instituted the following changes in the eligibility and selection procedures for the AATSEEL book prizes, which became effective during the 2002 competition.

Eligibility for the prizes in linguistics, literary/cultural criticism, and translation extends to books published in the preceding two calendar years (in the present case 2012 and 2013), but does not include those published in the current year (2014). For the prize in language pedagogy eligibility extends for the preceding three calendar years (2011-2013, in this case), but not the current year (2014).

Rationale: In the past, eligibility for all prizes has extended to books published in a three year period including the year in which the competition takes place. This gave an unfair advantage to books published early in the year, which in effect were eligible for a year longer than books published late in the year. It also made it difficult for jury members to examine some nominated books, which were not available in time for the committee's deliberations. This change addressed these issues. Further, the reduction of the eligibility window from three years to two for all prizes except that for pedagogy reflects the well-established nature of these prizes, which ensures that books are nominated in a timely manner. The prize for pedagogy has been implemented more recently than the others and needs more time to come into its own before a similar reduction in the eligibility window can be instituted.

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Publications Committee membership and contact information

The AATSEEL Publications Committee consists of fifteen members who serve staggered three-year terms, each of whom is assigned to one of four book-prize juries corresponding to his or her disciplinary affiliation and qualifications. All correspondence for the committee should be addressed to the current chair (term ends Dec. 2014):

Professor Justin Weir Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures Harvard University 326 Barker Center 12 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (617) 496-3737 (phone) (617) 496-4466 (fax) Email: weir@fas.harvard.edu

Language pedagogy jury:

  • Jason Merrill, Michigan State University (term ends Dec. 2016)
  • Elisabeth Elliott, Northwestern University (term ends Dec. 2014)
  • Nicole Monnier, University of Missouri (term ends Dec. 2014)

Linguistics jury:

  • Lenore Grenoble, University of Chicago (term ends Dec. 2015)
  • Jindrich Toman, University of Michigan (term ends Dec. 2014)

Literary/cultural studies jury:

  • Irina Shevelenko, University of Wisconsin (term ends Dec. 2016)
  • Gabriella Safran, Stanford University (term ends Dec. 2015)
  • Ilya Vinitsky, University of Pennsylvania (term ends Dec. 2014)

Translation jury:

  • Tim Langen, University of Missouri (term ends Dec. 2014)
  • Ronald Meyer, Columbia University (term ends Dec. 2014)
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