AATSEEL
 
 

AATSEEL Annual Awards

The AATSEEL Publications Committee is responsible for overseeing the appointment of editors for the AATSEEL Newsletter and Slavic and East European Journal, and also for the award of prizes for publications in the various disciplines participating in AATSEEL. For information on our activities, please follow the appropriate link below:

Nominees for the 2015 AATSEEL book prizes (Nomination will be closed as of 21 May)

Nominees for the 2015 AATSEEL Book Prizes

Best Contribution to Language Pedagogy (books or other material published in 2012, 2013 and 2014 eligible):

  • Dengub,Evgeny, Susanna Nazarova, and Irina Dubinina. www.teachrussian.org
  • Gerhart, Genevra with Eloise M. Boyle.The Russian's World 4th Edition. Bloomington, IN: Slavica Publishers, 2012.
  • Stuart Goldberg, Русская культура в двадцати одной песне from the Critical Languages Song Project (www.clsp.gatech.edu). 2013.
  • Каган, О.Е. и А.С. Кудыма.Учимся писать по-русски: экспресс-курс для двуязычных взрослых. Санкт-Петербург: «Златоуст», 2012.
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Best Contribution to Slavic Linguistics (books published in 2013 and 2014 eligible):

  • Gribble, Charles E. The Forms of Russian. Slavica: 2014.
  • Hart, David K. and Lundberg, Grant H. Fundamentals of the Structure and History of Russian. Slavica: 2013.
  • Janda, Laura et al. Why Russian Aspectual Prefixes Aren't Empty. Slavica: 2013.
  • Masako Ueda Fidler. Onomatopoeia in Czech. Slavica: 2014.
  • Pesetsky, David. Russian Case Morphology and the Syntactic Categories. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2013.
  • Pronk-Tiethoff, Saskia. The Germanic Loanwords in Proto-Slavic. Amsterdam-New York: Rodopi, 2013.
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Best Book in Literary/Cultural Studies (books published in 2013 and 2014 eligible):

  • Antonova, Katherine Pickering. An Ordinary Marriage: The World of a Gentry Family in Provincial Russia. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2013.
  • Banerjee, Anindita. We Modern People: Science Fiction and the Making of Russian Modernity. Wesleyan University Press 2013.
  • Batalden, Stephen K. Russian Bible Wars: Modern Scriptural Translation and Cultural Authority. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.
  • Blake, Elizabeth. Dostoevsky and the Catholic Underground. Northwestern University Press, 2014.
  • Burak, Alexander. "The Other" in Translation: A Case for Comparative Translation Studies. Bloomington, IN: Slavica, 2013.
  • Costlow, Jane T. Heart-Pine Russia: Walking and Writing the Nineteenth-Century Forest. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013.
  • Curtis, J. A. E. The Englishman from Lebedian'--A Life of Evgeny Zamiatin (1884-1937). Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2013.
  • Etkind, Alexander. Warped Mourning: Stories of the Undead in the Land of the Unburied. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013.
  • Fedorova, Milla. Yankees in Petrograd, Bolsheviks in New York: America and Americans in Russian Literary Perception. DeKalb: Northern Illinois Press, 2013.
  • Fishzon, Anna. Fandom, Authenticity, and Opera: Mad Acts and Letter Scenes in Fin-de-Siècle Russia. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
  • Holland, Kate. The Novel in the Age of Disintegration: Dostoevsky and the Problem of Genre in the 1870s. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013.
  • Golburt, Luba. The First Epoch. The Eighteenth Century and the Russian Cultural Imagination. Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 2014
  • Jones, Polly. Myth, Memory, Trauma: Rethinking the Stalinist Past in the Soviet Union, 1953-70. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013.
  • Kaminer, Jenny. Women with a Thirst for Destruction: The Bad Mother in Russian Culture. Northwestern University Press, 2014.
  • Khagi, Sofya Silence and the Rest: Verbal Skepticism in Russian Poetry. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013.
  • Kozlov, Denis. The Readers of Novyi Mir: Coming to Terms with the Stalinist Past. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2013.
  • McQuillen, Colleen. The Modernist Masquerade: Stylizing Life, Literature, and Costumes in Russia. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2013.
  • McReynolds, Louise. Murder Most Russian: True Crime and Punishment in Late Imperial Russia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013.
  • Niżyńska, Joanna. The Kingdom of Insignificance: Miron Bialoszewski and the Quotidian, the Queer, and the Traumatic. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013.
  • O'Keefe, Brigid. New Soviet Gypsies: Nationality, Performance, and Selfhood in the Early Soviet Union. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2013.
  • Paperno, Irina, “Who, What Am I?” Tolstoy Struggles to Narrate the Self. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2014.
  • Shrayer, Maxim D. I Saw It: Ilya Selvinsky and the Legacy of Bearing Witness to the Shoah. Boston, MA: Academic Studies Press, 2013.
  • Slobin, Greta N. Russians Abroad: Literary and Cultural Politics of Diaspora (1919-1939). Boston, MA: Academic Studies Press, 2013.
  • Usitalo, Steven A. The Invention of Mikhail Lomonosov. Boston, MA: Academic Studies Press, 2013.
  • Vaingurt, Julia Wonderlands of the Avant-Garde: Technology and the Arts in Russia of the 1920s. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013.
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Best Translation into English (books published in 2013 and 2014 eligible):

  • Abele, Inga. High Tide. Rochester, NY: Open Letter, University of Rochester, 2013. Translated from the Latvian by Kaija Straumanis.
  • Albahari, David. Globetrotter. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2014.Translated by Ellen Elias-Bursać.
  • Aleshkovsky, Peter. Stargorod. Montpelier, VT: Russian Life Books, 2013. Translated by Nina Shevchuk-Murray.
  • Mikhail Bulgakov. Don Quixote: A Dramatic Adaptation. MLA, 2014. Translated from Russian by Margarita Marinova, and edited by Margarita Marinova and Scott Pollard.
  • Cărtărescu, Mircea. Blinding. Brooklyn, NY: Archipelago Books, 2013. Translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter.
  • Chen, Dmitry. The Pet Hawk of the House of Abbas. Montpelier, VT: Edward & Dee, RIS Publications, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Liv Bliss.
  • Dostoevsky, Fyodor. Crime and Punishment. Penguin Press, 2014. Translated by Oliver Ready.
  • Dostoevsky, Fyodor. Notes From the Underground. Tonowanda, NY: Broadview Press, 2014. Ed. and translated by Kirsten Lodge.
  • Erofeev, Venedikt. Walpurgis Night. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2014. Translated by Marian Schwartz.
  • Gandlevsky, Segey. Trepanation of the Skull. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2014. Translated by Susanne Fusso.
  • Gilyarovsky, Vladimir. Moscow & Muscovites. Montpelier, VT: RIS, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Brendan Kiernan.
  • Grossman, Vasily. An Armenian Sketchbook. New York, NY: New York Review Books, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler. Introduction by Robert Chandler and Yury Bit-Yunan.
  • Hlasko, Marek. Beautiful Twentysomethings. Dekalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 2013. Translated from the Polish by Ross Ufberg.
  • Igov, Angel. A Short Tale of Shame. Rochester, NY: Open Letter, University of Rochester, 2013. Translated from the Bulgarian by Angela Rodel.
  • Ismailov, Hamid. The Underground. Restless Books, 2014. Translated by Carol Ermakova.
  • Krzhizhanovsky, Sigizmund. Autobiography of a Corpse. New York, NY: New York Review Books, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Joanne Turnbull with Nikolai Formozov. Introduction by Adam Thirlwell.
  • Agnieszka Kuciak. Distant Lands: An Anthology of Poets Who Don't Exist. White Pine Press, 2013. Translated into English by Karen Kovacik.
  • Lotman, Jurij M. The Unpredictable Workings of Culture. Tallinn: TLU Press, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Brian James Baer. Edited by Igor Pilshchikov and Silvi Salupere.
  • Madzirov, Nikola. Remnants of Another Age. Tarset, United Kingdom: Bloodaxe Books, 2013. Translated from the Macedonian by Peggy and Graham W. Reid, Magdalena Horvat and Adam Reed.
  • Martinovich, Victor. Paranoia: A Novel. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Diane Nemec Ignashev. Foreword by Timothy Snyder.
  • Mayakovsky, Vladimir. Selected Poems. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2013. Translated from the Russian by James H. McGavran III.
  • Myśliwski, Wieslaw. A Treatise on Shelling Beans: A Novel. Brooklyn, NY: Archipelago Books, 2013. Translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston.
  • Nalkowska, Zofia. The Romance of Teresa Hennert. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2014. Translated by Megan Thomas and Ewa Malachochowska-Pasek.
  • Nalkowska, Zofia. Choucas. Dekal: Northern Illinois University Press, 2014. Translated by Ursula Phillips.
  • Nekrasov, Vsevolod. I Live I See: Selected Poems. Brooklyn, NY: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Ainsley Morse and Bela Shayevich.
  • Pushkin, Alexander. The Captain’s Daughter. New York: New York Review Books, 2014. Translated by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler.
  • Rubinstein, Lev. Compleat Catalogue of Comedic Novelties. New York: Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014. Translated by Philip Metres and Tatiana Tulchinsky.
  • Sharov, Vladimir. Before & During. Dedalus Publishers, 2014. Translated by Oliver Ready.
  • Stambolova, Albena. Everything Happens As It Does. Rochester, NY: Open Letter, University of Rochester, 2013. Translated from the Bulgarian by Olga Nikolova.
  • Stanislavsky. A Life in Letters. London and New York: Routledge, 2014. Selected, translated and edited b Laurence Senelick.
  • Szerb, Antal. Journey by Moonlight. New York: New York Review Books, 2014. Translated by Len Rix.
  • Tolstoy, Leo. Anna Karenina. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2014. Translated by Marian Schwartz.
  • Tolstoy, Leo; Tolstaya, Sofiya; Tolstoy, Lev Lvovich. The Kreutzer Sonata Variations. Lev Tolstoy’s Novella and Counterstories by Sofiya Tolstaya and Lev Lvovich Tolstoy. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2014. Translated and edited by Michael R. Katz.
  • Tyrmand, Leopold. Diary 1954. Northwestern University Press, 2014. Translated by Anita Shelton and Andrew Wrobel
  • Vvedensky, Alexander. An Invitation for Me to Think. New York: New York Review Books, 2013. Translated from the Russian by Eugene Ostashevsky. Additional translations by Matvei Yankelevich.
  • Yershov, Pyotr. The Little Humpbacked Horse. Montpelier, VT: Russian Life Books, 2014. Translated by Lydia Razran Stone.
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Eligibility requirements and selection procedures for the AATSEEL book prizes:

AATSEEL  awards prizes to outstanding publications in the fields of 1) language pedagogy, 2) linguistics, 3) literary and/or cultural scholarship, and 4) translations into English. For more on the specific eligibility requirements of the individual prizes, and for recent recipients of the prizes, see below. General eligibility requirements and nomination procedures pertinent to all the prizes include:
  1. In order to be eligible for consideration for an AATSEEL Book Award, the author (not the nominator) must be a member of AATSEEL. In the case of books written by more than one author, at least one one of the authors must be a member of AATSEEL. Books by individuals who are not members of AATSEEL (or books written by teams of authors none of whom is a member of AATSEEL) cannot be considered for an AATSEEL book award.
  2. Nominated works must be devoted to the languages and the literary/cultural traditions of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.
  3. For the prizes in linguistics, literary/cultural scholarship and translation, works nominated must have been published within the two preceding calendar years. For the prize in language pedagogy, works nominated must have been published within the three preceding calendar years.
  4. The nomination process will normally end on 1 May. Prizes will be announced at the annual meeting of AATSEEL in early January.
  5. Both members of AATSEEL and non-members may make nominations for the prizes.
  6. In order to make a nomination for one of the prizes, one need only send an e-mail message to the chair of the publications committee (see "contact information" below). The chair will then contact the press. Presses wishing to nominate books should send a single copy of the work to the chair, who will (shortly after May 1) supply a list of the relevant jurors and their addresses. Presses are then asked to send a copy of the book directly to each of the jurors.

Specific eligibility guidelines for each prize:

Best Contribution to Language Pedagogy:

The prize in pedagogy may recognize either language-pedagogical materials or contributions to literature on the theory and practice of language teaching. The former category should be understood broadly to include textbooks, computer software, testing materials, and other instructional tools. Nominated works in the latter category should be single or multi-author books. At the committee's discretion, the prize may in some years be granted not to a single publication, but to the aggregate works of one individual whose publications as a whole have made an outstanding contribution to the field of language pedagogy.

Best Contribution to the Study of Slavic Linguistics:

Nominated works should be scholarly monographs (including grammars and dictionaries) that treat topics in any field of linguistic inquiry. Typically, translated and edited volumes would not be considered.

Best Book in Literary/Cultural Scholarship:

Nominated works should be scholarly books which treat topics in any field of literary or cultural studies. Normally, this will exclude works of historical scholarship, unless these are devoted to the history of literary or cultural institutions or to interdisciplinary topics uniting history and cultural life.

Best Translation into English:

Nominees for this prize should be book-length translations of a literary work, an epiliterary genre (letters, memoirs, essays, etc.), or a scholarly work. At the discretion of the jury, two prizes may be awarded, one for a literary or epiliterary work, the other for a translation of a strictly scholarly character.

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An explanation of recent modifications in eligibility and selection procedures for the book prizes

The Publications Committee of AATSEEL, with the approval of the Executive Council, has instituted the following changes in the eligibility and selection procedures for the AATSEEL book prizes, which became effective during the 2002 competition.

Eligibility for the prizes in linguistics, literary/cultural criticism, and translation extends to books published in the preceding two calendar years (in the present case 2013 and 2014), but does not include those published in the current year (2015). For the prize in language pedagogy eligibility extends for the preceding three calendar years (2012-2014, in this case), but not the current year (2015).

Rationale: In the past, eligibility for all prizes has extended to books published in a three year period including the year in which the competition takes place. This gave an unfair advantage to books published early in the year, which in effect were eligible for a year longer than books published late in the year. It also made it difficult for jury members to examine some nominated books, which were not available in time for the committee's deliberations. This change addressed these issues. Further, the reduction of the eligibility window from three years to two for all prizes except that for pedagogy reflects the well-established nature of these prizes, which ensures that books are nominated in a timely manner. The prize for pedagogy has been implemented more recently than the others and needs more time to come into its own before a similar reduction in the eligibility window can be instituted.

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Publications Committee membership and contact information

The AATSEEL Publications Committee consists of fifteen members who serve staggered three-year terms, each of whom is assigned to one of four book-prize juries corresponding to his or her disciplinary affiliation and qualifications. All correspondence for the committee should be addressed to the current chair (term ends Dec. 2017):

Professor Ilya Vinitsky
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
University of Pennsylvania
746 Williams Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305
phone: (215) 898-8704
fax: (215) 573-7794
Email: ivinitsk@sas.upenn.edu

Language pedagogy jury:

  • Jason Merrill, Michigan State University (term ends Dec. 2016)
  • Elisabeth Elliott, Northwestern University (term ends Dec. 2015)
  • Nicole Monnier, University of Missouri (term ends Dec. 2015)

Linguistics jury:

  • Lenore Grenoble, University of Chicago (term ends Dec. 2015)
  • John Bailyn, Stony Brook University (term ends Dec. 2016)

Literary/cultural studies jury:

  • Irina Shevelenko, University of Wisconsin (term ends Dec. 2016)
  • Gabriella Safran, Stanford University (term ends Dec. 2015)
  • Katia Dianina, University of Virginia (term ends Dec. 2017)

Translation jury:

  • Ellen Elias-Bursac, Tufts University (term ends Dec. 2016)
  • Joanna Trzeciak, Kent State University (term ends Dec. 2016)
  • Vitaly Chernetsky, University of Kansas (term ends Dec. 2017)
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